urn:uuid:b6da0616-4d94-5840-b818-fdcbf6cc4f81 Topic: Privacy – Ctrl blog Daniel Aleksandersen https://www.daniel.priv.no/ Copyright © 2022 Daniel Aleksandersen. https://www.ctrl.blog/assets/logo/logo-square.svg 2022-08-12T16:16:00Z weekly 10 urn:uuid:e37b8590-a8c5-4159-96a1-e50e89bb82f8 2022-08-12T16:16:00Z 2022-08-12T16:16:00Z Stop using DICT dictionary apps (such as GNOME/MATE Dictionary) MATE Desktop installs a Dictionary app (a fork of the retired GNOME Dictionary app). The apps don’t protect your pricacy, and you might want to stop using them. <p>The MATE Desktop for Linux installs a Dictionary app by default (a fork of the retired GNOME Dictionary app). The apps don’t protect your privacy, and you might want to stop using them.</p> <p><a href="https://www.ctrl.blog/entry/dict-protocol-privacy.html">Read more …</a></p> urn:uuid:bc46ab39-9a74-4690-8896-eed28aac875b 2022-07-20T09:26:00Z 2022-07-23T19:06:00Z TeamViewer installs suspicious font only useful for web fingerprinting A weird almost unreadable font file bundled with TeamViewer for Windows software lets website detect if you’ve installed the software. Raises privacy concerns. <p>So, here’s a bit of a mystery: Why does TeamViewer – the popular remote desktop program – install a font it doesn’t use on your computer? The abstract font (shown in the above image) doesn’t seem to serve any purpose in the software. Intentional or not, it enables websites to detect if you have TeamViewer installed on your computer.</p> <p><a href="https://www.ctrl.blog/entry/teamviewer-font-privacy.html">Read more …</a></p> urn:uuid:1ddd439f-ce4e-4a98-bbae-90ac9f0242b3 2022-03-09T14:37:00Z 2022-03-09T14:37:00Z Some discouraging anecdotes on how services handle account deletions I asked 124 services to delete my user account. The results were mixed. 21 never responded, and 16 responded by created even more accounts. Some outright lied. <p>I set out to purge my password manager for unused accounts and services. I also took the opportunity to request that the companies that stored that data should delete it. The results were quite discouraging.</p> <p><a href="https://www.ctrl.blog/entry/account-deletions-2021.html">Read more …</a></p> urn:uuid:69da5b31-500a-4db1-b5cd-c003cb4ad92e 2022-02-22T13:07:00Z 2022-02-22T13:07:00Z The web is overrun by pop-ups and blockers haven’t worked in years You can now expect every website to inundate you with pop-ups for email lists, promotions, and privacy theater. (No, the GDPR isn’t to blame.) Enough is enough. <p>Virtually all web browsers have a built-in feature to suppress an annoyance from the early days of the web: pop-ups. However, the pop-up blockers of yesteryear no longer work on today’s web. There are pop-ups everywhere gating our entry into virtually all websites. What happened to the pop-up blocker?</p> <p><a href="https://www.ctrl.blog/entry/pop-up-blocker.html">Read more …</a></p> urn:uuid:65e3ad7c-5c04-43e1-9dd7-b2785f28c7a2 2022-01-24T17:31:00Z 2022-01-24T17:31:00Z How a Hypercore P2P innovation could bring more privacy to IPFS IPFS want’s to replace HTTPS as the web’s content delivery protocol. However, it can’t do that without improving on user privacy. Hypercore has the solution. <p>The InterPlanetary File System (IPFS), like many other peer-to-peer (P2P) file-sharing networks, has a privacy problem. IPFS clients constantly broadcast what they want to download and what is available for upload. Anyone that can observe your network traffic, like an internet service provider (ISP) or other snoops, can see what you’re sharing.</p> <p><a href="https://www.ctrl.blog/entry/dht-privacy-discovery-hash.html">Read more …</a></p>